Thursday, October 30, 2008

Menezes police gave no warning, say witnesses

If the police and military had really thought de Menezes was a terrorist, they would have arrested him at his home (1) or as he walked to the bus stop (2) or after he got off the bus (3) and headed to the tube station.

At the inquest into the July 2005 murder of Jean Charles de Menezes at a London tube station, witnesses have stated that armed police fired on de Menezes without shouting any warning.

Menezes police 'gave no warning'

The police have consistently 'lied' about the murder of de Menezes, and there is a suspicion that the police and army knew de Menezes was an innocent man and that his killing was part of a 'strategy of terror' of the sort associated with Operation Gladio.

In the CIA-NATO's Operation Gladio, 'acts of terrorism were carried out in Italy' in order to keep certain parties in power.

Firearms officers had said de Menezes had moved towards them after they shouted warnings.

But Mrs de Menezes said outside the inquest: "None of the passengers heard the police give any warning or described Jean's actions as aggressive."



Rachel Wilson and her boyfriend Ralph Livock had been sitting opposite Mr de Menezes.

She told the inquest nothing had been said to alert her that the men were plain-clothes officers and that she initially thought they were just messing around.

Nicholas Hilliard QC, counsel to the inquest, asked her: "Specifically, did you ever hear anybody shout 'armed police'?"

Ms Wilson answered: "If I had heard that, I would have thought they were police, so no."

Mr Livock had told the inquest that their train was held up for longer than usual when four casually-dressed men with guns got on board.

Mr Hilliard asked: "Had you heard anything said about police?"

Mr Livock replied: "No, certainly not.

"I remember that specifically because one of the conversations that Rachel and I had afterwards was that we had no idea whether these were police, whether they were terrorists, whether they were somebody else.

"The thing that made me realise it wasn't a group of lads playing around or something else happening was when the first shot was fired."

De menezes

Mr Livock described Mr de Menezes' reactions when an officer pointed a pistol at his head.

"He looked as if he was expecting somebody to say something but he didn't look frightened," said Mr Livock.

If the police and military had really thought de Menezes was a terrorist, they would have arrested him at his home or as he walked to the bus stop or after he got off the bus and headed to the tube station.

It is believed by some that a secretive government agency was behind the London Bombings.

News - Europe - Italy probes 'parallel police' .

aangirfan: The Bologna Bomb 1980, Gladio, terrorism in Europe

aangirfan: Operation Gladio: Template for the War on Terror



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